/Stratégiai társasjátékok
  • Gloomy Graves

    6 490 Ft
    In Gloomy Graves, you work as a gravedigger in a dark fantasy world in which epic battles rage continuously. The corpses of pixies, goblins, unicorns, cyclops, and dragons have begun to pile up, so you've got your work cut out for you. Manage your private crypt and the communal graveyard, each with different placement rules. Keep the place organized as you bury corpses in different areas of the graveyard, or it's your own grave you'll be digging! You earn points based on how well-organized you keep your private crypt and the communal graveyard, grouping corpse types together. You also earn points at the end of the game for the number of different corpse types you've scored on during the game. Whoever collects the most points wins! https://youtu.be/5r_4AK98Xd0
  • Stellar

    7 490 Ft
    Space! For millennia, humans have marveled at the cosmos. Modern astronomy gives us valuable insight about what’s happening in the universe, but there is still a sense of wonder to be had in looking up at the expanse above us. In Stellar, you are stargazers, calibrating your telescopes to bring into view celestial objects of various types — planets, moons, asteroids, interstellar clouds, black holes, even satellites — as you create a beautiful display of the night sky! You have eleven rounds to play cards to your telescope and notebook, building a night sky tableau. After that, you'll calculate your points, and the stargazer with the most point wins! Nézzétek meg Molnár Peti DRAFT vlogjának Hidden Gem videóját, nagyon alaposan és szépen bemutatja ezt a különleges kis játékot! https://youtu.be/wYicCeskq78 https://youtu.be/jzdNS0_pWhM
  • Moons

    6 490 Ft
    Moons is a trick-taking card game in which suits are represented by different planets in our solar system, and card ranks are represented by the moons that orbit them. Set Up Separate all the planet tokens and place them off to one side of the table within reach of the players. (Saturn, Jupiter, Neptune and Uranus) Remove all the scoring reference cards and give one to each player. Put any extra reference cards back in the box. Shuffle all the small Asteroid cards and deal two to each player. Place the remaining Asteroid cards in a draw deck off to one side of the table within reach of the players. Shuffle all the larger Moon cards and deal the whole deck out to the players one at a time in clockwise order. Put the block token (red circle with a line through it) off to one side of the table within reach of the players. Quick Play 1. Complete the set up 2. All players create a face down three card tableau 3. All players reveal tableaus simultaneously 4. Highest card in tableau gains first player marker (first round only) 5. The first player may play an Asteroid card if he/she wishes 6. First player leads first trick by playing one Moon card 7. In clockwise order from the first player, all other players may play one Asteroid card if they wish, and then must play one Moon card (must follow suit if able) 8. The player with the highest numbered on-suit card wins the trick and gains a planet token that matches any suit in his/her tableau 9. The lowest off-suit card wins a token matching the off-suit played (if tied, low off-suits do not get a token) 10. The winner of the trick leads the next trick 11. After all cards have been played, the winner of the most tricks gains 1 planet token of their choice (does not have to match tableau) — In the case of a tie, all tied players receive 1 token of choice 12. Players who earned zero tricks may take one token that matches any card in their tableau 13. Pass the first player token to the left (the Earth’s moon token) — the Earth token should never be moved as it marks the starting point 14. The new first player deals out all cards for the next round and leads the first trick 15. Repeat until all tokens are gone or until all players have dealt one time Players score points based on sets of tokens. https://youtu.be/On_uoSY74sg
  • KS projekt, várható beérkezés 2020 október. In Pax Pamir, players assume the role of nineteenth century Afghan leaders attempting to forge a new state after the collapse of the Durrani Empire. Western histories often call this period "The Great Game" because of the role played by the Europeans who attempted to use central Asia as a theater for their own rivalries. In this game, those empires are viewed strictly from the perspective of the Afghans who sought to manipulate the interloping ferengi (foreigners) for their own purposes. In terms of game play, Pax Pamir is a pretty straightforward tableau builder. Players spend most of their turns purchasing cards from a central market, then playing those cards in front of them in a single row called a court. Playing cards adds units to the game's map and grants access to additional actions that can be taken to disrupt other players and influence the course of the game. That last point is worth emphasizing. Though everyone is building their own row of cards, the game offers many ways for players to interfere with each other directly and indirectly. To survive, players will organize into coalitions. Throughout the game, the dominance of the different coalitions will be evaluated by the players when a special card, called a "Dominance Check", is resolved. If a single coalition has a commanding lead during one of these checks, those players loyal to that coalition will receive victory points based on their influence in their coalition. However, if Afghanistan remains fragmented during one of these checks, players instead will receive victory points based on their personal power base. After each Dominance Check, victory is checked and the game will be partially reset, offering players a fresh attempt to realize their ambitions. The game ends when a single player is able to achieve a lead of four or more victory points or after the fourth and final Dominance Check is resolved. https://youtu.be/uIdis8cAXvk
  • KS projekt, várható beérkezés 2020 október - Pax Pamir 2nd edition + 40 db fémpénz és húzózsák In Pax Pamir, players assume the role of nineteenth century Afghan leaders attempting to forge a new state after the collapse of the Durrani Empire. Western histories often call this period "The Great Game" because of the role played by the Europeans who attempted to use central Asia as a theater for their own rivalries. In this game, those empires are viewed strictly from the perspective of the Afghans who sought to manipulate the interloping ferengi (foreigners) for their own purposes. In terms of game play, Pax Pamir is a pretty straightforward tableau builder. Players spend most of their turns purchasing cards from a central market, then playing those cards in front of them in a single row called a court. Playing cards adds units to the game's map and grants access to additional actions that can be taken to disrupt other players and influence the course of the game. That last point is worth emphasizing. Though everyone is building their own row of cards, the game offers many ways for players to interfere with each other directly and indirectly. To survive, players will organize into coalitions. Throughout the game, the dominance of the different coalitions will be evaluated by the players when a special card, called a "Dominance Check", is resolved. If a single coalition has a commanding lead during one of these checks, those players loyal to that coalition will receive victory points based on their influence in their coalition. However, if Afghanistan remains fragmented during one of these checks, players instead will receive victory points based on their personal power base. After each Dominance Check, victory is checked and the game will be partially reset, offering players a fresh attempt to realize their ambitions. The game ends when a single player is able to achieve a lead of four or more victory points or after the fourth and final Dominance Check is resolved. https://youtu.be/uIdis8cAXvk
  • Akció!
    What if the formation of Earth had gone differently? In Ecos: First Continent, players are forces of nature molding the planet, but with competing visions of its grandeur. You have the chance to create a part of the world, similar but different to the one we know. Which landscapes, habitats, and species thrive will be up to you. Gameplay in Ecos is simultaneous. Each round, one player reveals element tokens from the element bag, giving all players the opportunity to complete a card from their tableau and shape the continent to their own purpose. Elements that cannot be used can be converted into energy cubes or additional cards in hand or they can be added to your tableau to give you greater options as the game evolves. Mountain ranges, jungle, rivers, seas, islands and savanna, each with their own fauna, all lie within the scope of the players' options. https://youtu.be/taUWDwCMLjo
  • ...még kevés az infó, de ÚJ Stefan Feld játék érkezik márciusban, a Burgundy nyomdokain...Ha bármi érdekes, új infóm lesz, azt úgyis felteszem ide, bár nagy a titkolózás, illetve az FB oldalra is - március végén érkezik be terv szerint a webshopba, de az sem lehetetlen, hogy eltolják a megjelenést őszre, sajnos manapság, bármi elképzelhető... - de az biztos, hogy lesz! The Castles of Tuscany is a standalone game that might resemble The Castles of Burgundy in some way. https://youtu.be/tDs8CPdqVRE
  • Mandala

    8 490 Ft
      The Mandala: the symbol of an ancient and sacred ritual. Colored sand is laid to create a symbolic map of the world before the pattern is ceremonially destroyed and the sand cast into the river. In the two-player game Mandala, you are trying to score more than your opponent by collecting valuable cards — but you won't know which cards are valuable until well into the game! Over the course of the game, players play their colored cards into the two mandalas, building the central shared mountains and laying cards into their own fields. As soon as a mandala has all six colors, the players take turns choosing the colors in the mountain and adding those cards to their "river" and "cup". At the end of the game, the cards in your cup are worth points based on the position of their colors in that player's river. The player whose cup is worth more points wins. The linen playmat shows two circular mandalas, with each being divided by a horizontal space (the mountain) to create one "field" for each player. The playmat has seven spaces in front of each player to hold their river of single face-up cards and their cup: the stack of face-down cards which they score at the end of the game. To begin, each player receives a hand of six cards. Each player receives two random cards face down in their cup, then two random cards are dealt face up into the central mountain strip of each mandala. On your turn, you may play either a single card into one of mountains, or one or more matching cards into one of your fields. All cards played into a mandala must follow the "Rule of Color": Once a color has been played into one of the three areas of a mandala, then later cards of the same color can be played only into that same area. Thus, once your opponent has played red cards into their field, then you can't play red cards in your field, and neither you nor your opponent can play red cards into the central mountain. If you played a card into a mountain, draw three new cards from the deck at the end of your turn; if you played cards into one of your fields, do not draw new cards. A mandala is completed once it contains all six colors of cards. When this happens, the players "destroy" the mandala, taking turns to choose a color present in the mountain and claim all cards of that color. Whoever played more cards in their field chooses first; if tied, the player who did not complete the mandala chooses first. The first time you claim cards of a specific color, lay one of these cards in the lowest-valued empty space in your river, then place the rest into your cup. The spaces in your river are valued 1-6 in order, so cards of the first color you claim will be worth 1 point each, cards of the second color you claim worth 2 points each, and so on. Once a mandala has been destroyed and all the colors in the mountain claimed, cards played in the fields are discarded, two new cards are dealt face up into the mountain, and the game continues. The end of the game is triggered either when the deck is exhausted or when one player adds a sixth color to their river. Both players then tally the value of all the cards in their cup, based on the position of the colors in their river, and whoever has the higher score wins! Contents:
    • 1 linen playmat
    • 108 mandala cards (18 in each of 6 colours)
    • 2 reference cards
    https://youtu.be/dkAy7wirifc      
  • Era: Medieval Age serves as the spiritual successor to Roll Through The Ages. While Roll Through The Ages was a pioneer for roll-and-write-style games, Era is a pioneer for roll-and-build! In Era, your dice represent different classes of medieval society as players attempt to build the most prosperous city. The "build" comes into play as players actually build their cities on their boards. You will use beautifully modeled three-dimensional components such as walls, keeps, farms, and other structures. By the end of the game, each player will have a unique city of their very own! Era: Medieval Age is made even more challenging as players interact with each other in ways such as extortion, scorched earth, and, of course, disease! Hey, this is the Medieval Age, right? Speaking of which, Era serves as the first of a new series of standalone roll-and-build games from Matt Leacock and eggertspiele!   https://youtu.be/XsFhkSsNwZk

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